street of Ancient Rome

USA’s Love for Ancient Rome. Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times: “We like stories of Rome, I think, because in spite of the intervening centuries we can recognize ourselves there: a technologically superior mercantile and military superpower pressing an enormous thumb upon the Western world, its bustling cities full of bars and restaurants and hot-drink shops and theaters. Positively Dickensian in the way it trains an eye on both the powerful and the poor, Rome [the HBO BBC Tv Series] wants us to see the present in the past — offering cocktail parties, rich girls smoking hemp (“I brought back two sacks from Macedonia sooooo much better than the Italian kind”), a criminals’ den that looks like nothing so much as a 1st century BC [The Sopranos’] Bada Bing.”

Read the entire article by Robert Lloyd.

Above, an image from Rome‘s set, at Rome Cinecittà studios: source.

Polly Walker

The German slave. Getting back to a typical Sex and the city (of Rome) topic, I read in a blog that a US high school teacher used to describe Ancient Rome’s history as a sequence of sex, battle, sex, battle, which seems a little bit too limited a view to me. In any case, for you (now disappointed and bored) sex weirdos, a brief quote from the Boston Globe that will make you happy:

“Take, for instance, this cozy domestic scene in the ‘Rome’ première. It’s the morning of Caesar’s funeral, and the ever-lusty Mark Antony (James Purefoy ) refuses to get out of bed unless Atia [Polly Walker, see smal picture above,] dressed in her funeral garb, agrees to have sex. Impatient and unsure of her social status now that her uncle Caesar is gone, Atia coldly refuses him. Ever practical, though, she then barks an order at her slaves: ‘Fetch that German slut from the kitchen’. ”
Read the entire review by Matthew Gilbert.

Funny, although a bit on the masculist side, this comment from a fan of the ‘Rome’ series: “Oh, would that we all had these convenient German sluts around. But, you know, now they’re all union and hard to keep on staff”.

Watch now this trailer from the TV series regarding Roman different moral code (which is not to be seen by minors, who are thus warned.)

Spanish Cousins Success. “One secret of Spain’s success has been its links to Latin America – an excellent testing ground for Spanish foreign investment and a useful source of Spanish-speaking immigrants.
Spain’s immigration policy has been more liberal than in most European countries, adding some 4m to the 40m population in the past decade. Those from Latin America, in particular, have proved swift to integrate. The proportion of children from mixed marriages increased from 1.8 per cent in 1995 to 11.5 per cent in 2005.”

Read the entire Ftimes article.

7 thoughts on “Random Stuff

  1. Certainly Sex didn’t get them that huge of an empire. Must have been brains in there too! 😀

    On an unrelated note, I watched King Arthur the day before. It was… good. A different [if mostly erroneous ] look at the legend. It was interesting, especially the Romans just deserting the British Isle.

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  2. @Ashish
    I have seen that movie too and I also found it interesting. What fascinates me of those places (Brit islands) is this lack of sun and light which makes all so ….unreal (surreal?).

    PS
    I wanted to continue the story in your blog but only moronic things came to my mind so I decided not to 🙂

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  3. PPS
    I am adding you to my blogroll. The reason I didn’t so far is all that geeky stuff I am trying to escape from lol

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  4. Ah yes. Sex, battle, sex etc. The simplistic view for simpletons. Edward Gibbons only dedicated part of his life and considerable talents on the subject of Rome and now we have such “teachers” to shed rays of wisdom upon students.

    Then again, Michael Moore is a hit among some of our blessed “intellectuals” too.

    Sigh.

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  5. I have seen that movie too and I also found it interesting. What fascinates me of those places (Brit islands) is this lack of sun and light which makes all so ….unreal (surreal?).
    Lol. Ever since playing that game Age of Empires II, I’ve been fascinated with English history and this film has once again renewed those interests. [Plus, also shows that games entice you to learn as well. Its because of the AoE series that history was my favourite subject. 😀 ]

    I wanted to continue the story in your blog but only moronic things came to my mind so I decided not to
    LOL. well, you could have after all the story did turn out to be one of the most hilarious nonsense in human history. 😀

    I am adding you to my blogroll. The reason I didn’t so far is all that geeky stuff I am trying to escape from lol
    YAY!! My B’day gift!! 😀

    Pssst… nobody would ever call me “full of brains”. 😛

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  6. @The Commentator
    Ah yes. Sex, battle, sex etc. The simplistic view for simpletons.
    Well, maybe that statement was kinda ironic. I cannot find that post any more though. Don’t sigh Commentator, American intellectuals are not that naive. 🙂

    @Ashish
    Ever since playing that game Age of Empires II, I’ve been fascinated with English history.
    I agree that video games and multimedia can be highly instructive. I wrote a (boring) post on this topic lol

    Psst…nobody would ever call me “full of brains”
    Ugh? Ok, I’ll change it then 🙂

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